When I set out to create Vanishing Cuba more than two years ago, I was prepared for everything, or so I thought. I knew there would be months of photo editing, a year or more of writing, endless creative decisions, material selections, and so on. I was ready for all the twists and turns and a never-ending checklist of hundreds of details. 

What I wasn’t prepared for were the global supply chain problems that arose in the new Covid world we live in. That’s a fancy way of saying it’s been a costly nightmare shipping across continents! Shipping containers that now cost 4 to 5x what they cost when I started this project. Ground shipping that’s 2 to 3x more expensive. 

When the first books were ready to ship, we were smack in the middle of the holiday shipping season. So to get some books as early as possible, our printer in Italy went out of their way and air-shipped us several pallets of books (see photos). Next, we had to decide whether to wait for all the books to be completed at the bindery or split them into two shipments—a logical decision but a more expensive one. 

The first shipment we received in early January had already been sold out from pre-orders dating back to May. Just two weeks later, the second shipment left La Spezia, Italy, aboard the container ship CSCL Sydney and is due to arrive in New Jersey this weekend. Once it clears customs, the books will be on their way to our warehouse to fulfill our December and January orders, as well as distribution to Amazon, bookstores, and libraries. Finally, our third (and largest shipment) will arrive in April. 

It’s great that the book is finally out. The first reviews are coming in, and I am very pleased. If you get a chance, please check them out. Each edition has its own set of reviews. If you received a book and haven’t left a review, please do so. 

In just four short weeks, the book has shipped to six continents. Countries include the United States, Australia, Egypt, Italy, Hong Kong, France, New Zealand, Mexico, Denmark, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Croatia, Israel, Guatemala, India, Argentina, and Canada. 

I want to thank everyone for your patience. Your support over the last nine months has meant the world to me. I can’t wait for everyone to see and read the book. Thank you again!

Much love, Michael. 

LEICA FOTOGRAFIE INTERNATIONAL REVIEWS VANISHING CUBA

LEICA FOTOGRAFIE INTERNATIONAL REVIEWS VANISHING CUBA

Cuba – the Caribbean island, is surely one of the most photographed places in the world. The light, the colours, the people, and the life on the streets: each moment seems to offer a perfect opportunity for a picture. One photographer who has explored Cuba repeatedly, through the perspective of his camera, is the American Michael Chinnici. His gorgeous photo book draws on the wealth of stories, experiences and encounters he has gathered during more than twenty trips in recent years. There is no doubt that the New York-based photographer has been successful in his efforts to capture the “soul of Cuba” in pictures.

PHOTOBOOK JOURNAL REVIEWS VANISHING CUBA

PHOTOBOOK JOURNAL REVIEWS VANISHING CUBA

Wow!!! Thank you, Melanie Chapman, for writing such a wonderful review of my Vanishing Cuba book! And to quote the poet John Dunne… “The poet John Dunne wrote “No man is an island…”. Spend time experiencing Cuba through Chinnici’s insightful eyes, and you may be tempted to reply “…and no island is one man.”

PRESTIGIOUS AESTHETICA MAGAZINE REVIEWS VANISHING CUBA

PRESTIGIOUS AESTHETICA MAGAZINE REVIEWS VANISHING CUBA

“The first thing that caught my attention when I received the first draft of the book was its title,” writes Havana-born activist artist Leonor Anthony in the foreword to Vanishing Cuba, the latest volume from New York-based photographer Michael Chinnici. “What is it, in fact, that is vanishing?”

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